Respect Users’ Data

One of the immutable tenets of designing mobile user experiences is to respect (and protect) your users’ data. This means, among other things, saving form data as users move from screen to screen and eliminating the need for them to type the same information more than once.

Time Magazine iPhone App
Time Magazine iPhone App

Time Magazine either didn’t know or didn’t follow this tenet in the latest update to its iPhone app. When I launched the app for the first time after updating to version 2.2 I was shown an alert telling me that my customized settings had been reset and that I needed to redo them. To be honest, I don’t even recall what settings I may have customized (I download and explore a lot of apps and many, like this one, almost never get used after the first week). But I certainly wasn’t going to customize anything again if my settings could just be wiped out without a warning.

There are several reasons my settings may have been reset: a change to the underlying data structure that rendered them unusable, settings that I had customized had been removed, careless or rushed programming, or a simple bug that slipped through testing. If there was a legitimate reason, the app could have done a better job of letting me know why. While this may be a trivial matter for infrequent users, it could be a big deal to someone who uses the app regularly.

Sometimes apps have to change their business rules and functionality as they evolve. This is unavoidable. But app creators can manage these changes better if they start with a healthy respect for their users.