Mobile UX Design With Rachel Hinman

This week I attended Rachel Hinman’s day-long workshop on The Mobile Frontier at the UX Immersion 2012 conference. The conference, a new gathering arranged by User Interface Enginnering, featured deep dives on mobile and agile development. Here are my notes:

There are Many Similarities Between Mobile and Desktop UX Design

  • Many of the tools and techniques we use are the same.
  • We sketch.
  • We prototype.
  • We need to learn what our users need and want.

But There are Also Differences

  • A phone is not a computer.
  • There is no sense of having windows or UI depth.
  • There is a smaller screen for user input and new inputs based on context and device sensors.

How a UX Designer Transitions to the Mobile Mindset

  • Buy a device and integrate it into your life.
  • Know the medium and become mindful.
  • Participate in the experience.
  • Brace yourself for a fast and crazy ride.
  • This is an emergent area of user experience so nothing we do will be constant for long.
  • Embrace ambiguity, it’s fun and exciting.

Context is complex but is essential to great mobile experiences

  • The mobile context is about understanding the relations between people, places, and things.
  • Relationships between people, places, and things are spatial, temporal, social, and semantic.

Designing for Contexts

  • Design for inattention and interruption.
  • The mobile use experience is snorkling, the desktop user experience is scuba diving.
  • Reduce cognitive load at every step in the experience.
  • Ideate in the wild — you can’t innovate in mobile from behind your monitor.
  • Ruthlessly edit content and features down to what’s essential.

Sketching

  • It’s a good way to develop ruthless editing skills.
  • You can change a design quickly at little cost.
  • No expert skills needed.

Prototyping

  • The exercise helps designers new to mobile who do not yet know the heuristics and constraints of the medium.
  • It’s essential for mobile UX because the medium is so new.
  • If you are prototyping for a desktop app and a mobile app, allocate to mobile triple the amount of time you devout to the desktop.
  • Prototyping helps you fail early and fast.
  • Because a mobile experience is so contextual and personal, explore techniques like body storming and storyboarding.
  • Prototyping is a great way to fail when it matters (and costs) the least.
  • Desktop prototyping is a luxury, mobile prototyping is essential.

Graphical User Interface vs. Natural User Interface

  • We are at a pivotal moment in the design of user experiences — the NUI/GUI chasm.
  • A GUI features heavy chrome, icons, buttons, affordances; what you see is what you get.
  • A NUI features a little chrome as possible and is fluid so content can be the star.
  • As UX designers we need to work to eliminate chrome, not make the chrome beautiful.

Motion as a Design Element

  • Animations and transitions can teach users how the information unfolds (see Flipboard).
  • Motion brings fun to the party, and who doesn’t want to have fun.

Rachel Hinman is the author of the forthcoming The Mobile Frontier. You can follow her on Twitter at @hinman