The Value of Flexible Prototyping

I recently experienced firsthand the power of flexible prototyping — and it is powerful.

I was doing in-lab, moderated usability testing of a mobile website experience and had reached that point where after a few participants you know you have a problem and the team wants to test a new solution. Our team’s visual designer — also a rock star front-end coder — offered to cook up a new prototype mixing the UI elements from the current site that tested well with participants with some design elements from our prototype that also seemed to be testing well.

The prototype in question was coded in HTML5 and jQuery, running on iPhones and Androids off Dropbox. After about 30 minutes, he came back to the observation room to say the new prototype was ready to go.

Because we were at the last test session of the day, we could only test the new design with one participant, so we certainly couldn’t say it was a design success. But it did eliminate the stumbling block we kept running into.

Perhaps more importantly, the experience reminded the team of the power of lightweight flexible prototypes that can be changed and deployed very quickly. Our approach to future test planning will be focusing on how we can change the prototype mid-test, which should open the door to a more adaptive approach to user research.