iOS Icons For Web Apps

I just created a new set of iOS home screen icons for this website. Creating multiple home screen icons allows the icon that launches your site to look professional and crisp on Apple’s retina and pre-retina displays for iPhone and iPad.

Icons: Before and After
Icons: Before and After

It’s very easy to do. Just create a set of PNG image at 57×57 pixels, 72×72 pixels, 114×114 pixels, and 144×144 pixels. Create the images individually in Photoshop and don’t just resize the largest to the smaller sizes. Create the images as squares with 90-degree corners. iOS will take care of adding the rounded edges and reflective effect.

The image in this post shows the raw PNG I created and how it looked after iOS applied its effects. You can also tell iOS not to alter your image by using the “-precomposed” option. This approach is used by a lot of sites and apps like Path and Pinterest. Apple’s developer documentation will tell you how to do that.

Once your images are created, place them at the document root of your web server. Then add the <link> tags below in the <head> section of your site’s pages. And with that you’ll have nice clean home screen icons for people who want to keep your site one tap away on their Apple devices.

<link rel="apple-touch-icon" sizes="57x57" href="/apple-touch-icon-57x57.png" />
<link rel="apple-touch-icon" sizes="72x72" href="/apple-touch-icon-72x72.png" />
<link rel="apple-touch-icon" sizes="114x114" href="/apple-touch-icon-114x114.png" />
<link rel="apple-touch-icon" sizes="144x144" href="/apple-touch-icon-144x144.png" />

The icons are used by the different devices in this way:

  • 57×57 will be for iPhone 3GS, 2011 iPod Touch, and older Android devices
  • 72×72 will be for iPad 1, iPad 2, and iPad mini
  • 114×114 will be for iPhone 4, 4S, 5, and 2012 iPod Touch
  • 144×144 will be for for iPad 3 and 4

For more information on configuring web apps, see Apple’s iOS Developer Library.

Safari Reader Improves Mobile Browsing

One of the little-mentioned features in Apple’s new iOS 5 is the addition of Reader in Mobile Safari. Reader, which was introduced in desktop Safari last year, allows a user to click a button in the browser address bar to render a webpage in a user-friendly, text-only format.

Reader instantly turns mobile webpages that may be poorly designed or have small fonts into elegant and highly readable pages. All ads, photos, and graphics are stripped from the page. Reader also merges articles that may be spread across several pages on a mobile website into a single scrollable page. And as with all things Mac, the handling of typography is excellent.

Reader is based on technology licensed from Readability, which also created a bookmarklet version for desktop web browsers and is embedded in the Amazon Kindle and popular iPad applications like Flipboard and Reeder.

Below is an article from the Chicago Tribune using the normal Mobile Safari display and Reader. I know which one I’d rather read.

Mobile Safari Reader
Mobile Safari Reader

App Store Flow on iPhone Could Be Streamlined

Normally I love the iTunes App Store, but not so much today. I was trying to add Kayak’s travel app to my new iPhone and found the experience to be full of unnecessary and redundant tapping.

This was my screen flow:

  1. Launched the App Store
  2. Clicked Search
  3. Typed “kayak” and clicked the Search button
  4. Tapped Kayak’s app on the list screen
  5. Clicked the Free button
  6. Clicked the Install button
  7. Received a prompt for my password
  8. Entered my password and click the OK button
  9. Received a message asking me to confirm I wanted to download the app since Apple had detected this was a new device
  10. Clicked the Continue button
  11. Received a prompt for my password
  12. Entered my password and click the OK button
  13. Got directed to billing page with a request to confirm all information (since this was the first time using this device)
  14. Entered credit card security code without making any other changes and clicked the Done button
  15. Returned to the Kayak screen
  16. Clicked the Free button
  17. Clicked the Install button
  18. Done

Did I really need to enter my password twice? The App Store should be smart enough to know I just entered a password when sending me to the billing information page. Normally I don’t mind having to authenticate when accessing billing information, but not when I just did it a moment ago and am finger tapping an iPhone.

Another redundant step was requiring me to tap the Free and Install buttons a second time after going through the setup screens. At that point I had gone through 36 taps, so I think I clearly expressed my desire to download the app (“Really, I do want it!”, I thought). The App Store should have just started the download.

A last unneeded step was asking me to update my payment information to download a free app. My guess is that was done to get my iPhone ready for seamless purchasing in the future, but that’s a business goal of Apple’s, not a user goal of mine. I just wanted to download a free app. Ask me to confirm my billing information when it’s really needed.

My entire Kayak download took 38 taps. Eliminating the second password prompt and the last two buttons would have cut it to 26, a 31% reduction in taps. That’s a lot in a mobile experience. Dropping the credit card setup for a free app would have removed four more taps. Luke Wroblewski stated it best in Web Form Design, don’t ask for data you don’t need to complete the user’s task at hand.

As I said before, I love the App Store. But its download flow needs some streamlining, especially in the mobile context. I’m surprised Apple missed this aspect of the store’s design given its usual laser-focus on all the small details. As Charles Eames said: “The details are not the details. They make the design.”

Design Tools for iPad

Apple’s iPad has been out only a few weeks and already clever software developers are building design tools for this amazing new platform.

The Omni Group, makes of the popular OmniGraffle wireframing tool, have released OmniGraphSketcher for iPad. Priced at $14.99 in the iTunes App Store, OmniGraphSketcher allows you to create attractive charts, graphs, and other data visualizations on the iPad.

And Endloop, a Canadian iPhone/iPad development company, has released iMockups, a wireframing and diagramming tool for the iPad. Available on iTunes for $9.99, the app allows designers to create Balsamiq-like wireframes using their fingers.

I haven’t used iMockups but Endloop says in its blog that upcoming features include snap-to grid lines, a border and background color picker for UI controls, improved customization of UI controls, additional UI controls, more icons, and the ability to export to email, XML, or PDF. iMockups gets a 3-and-half-star rating from users in the iTunes store and the few reviews there comment about the app not being 100% ready yet.

It will be interesting to see how OmniGraphSketcher, iMockups, and other diagramming apps for the iPad add to the collaborative design process. For now I’m still keeping my sketchbook handy, but this could be the first wave of exciting new additions to the interaction design toolbox.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOyIVqJcGfc]

iPad Misses on Several Key Points

The world got its first look at the long awaited iPad from Apple this week. And after digging into it bit I think I can wait a little longer to actually get one, though, as Apple has missed some key functionality.

iPad Home Screen

A few of the key features Apple missed are:

No camera: Video chat is impossible without a built in iSight camera. With the hardware as large as it is there is no reason not to have a camera, and one better than the 2.5 megapixel on the iPhone.

No multitasking: There’s no reason a more powerful processor couldn’t have been included so that Mac OS X could be supported. And that’s another miss in itself.

No Mac OS X: Limiting the iPad to the iPhone OS removes a lot of key functionality for mobile users. Unless someone is planning to use Google Docs and other cloud-based apps there is a lot you can’t do with Apple’s “magical” new machine. Business travelers and many other users will find themselves having to carry an iPad and laptop.

Battery not removable: The 10-hour life of the battery is a big improvement over iPhone, but for the cost of the iPad it should come with a removable battery so a heavy user could charge it and swap in a backup.

Lack of clarity on GPS: It’s not clear if the iPad has a dedicated GPS chip or if that will be available on all models. The tech specs indicate Assisted GPS will be used, but not a dedicated GPS chip like one would find on a Garmin. It’s hard to believe Apple wouldn’t match the quality of location-based services available to the 3GS so I suspect this is more of a marketing or semantic problem than a technical limitation of the iPad.

While the iPad is a big advance in multitouch technology and will provide a great mobile web surfing experience, it does not offer enough functionality to replace the laptop, which is what many people were expecting. This is likely a business decision by Apple to not cannibalize the market for their Macbooks. The iPad may have strong appeal to BlackBerry users who want some of the iPhone experience without having to give up their Berry. Only time will tell if Apple made the right calls in limiting what iPad can do.