Sketchcamp Chicago

Work faster, not harder.

That was the message last week at the inaugural Sketchcamp Chicago conference. The one-day event, attended by about 75 UX architects, designers, and strategists, focused on tips and techniques for using sketching as a lightweight tool for user experience design.

Greg Nudelman's Amazon Sketches
Greg Nudelman's Amazon Sketches

My Amazon iPhone App Sketch
My Amazon iPhone App Sketch

In an exercise lead by Greg Nudelman, author of Designing Search: UX Strategies for eCommerce Success, participants were shown wireframes sketched on 3″ x 5″ Post-it notes of a search path on Amazon’s iPhone app. Nudelman then had us spend a few minutes sketching our own approaches, which included carousels, a scrollable gallery of images representing product categories, list drilldowns, and free text searches àla Google.

By the end of the exercise at least 7 different approaches were identified, showing that sketching allows for the quick expression of ideas without the encumbrances of tools like Omnigraffle or Visio. Attached to this post are Nudelman’s Amazon sketches and my take on using a carousel to represent product categories. My approach was far from optimal, but that illustrates the theme of the conference — sketching allows you to get ideas out of your head and into the world where they can be explored, refined, or discarded.

Another speaker discussed storyboarding as a way to communicate customer value to business stakeholders.

Digital and industrial designer Craighton Berman showed how he uses storyboards to illustrate user engagement and benefits in ways that a standard business plan cannot. The strength of storyboards is their ability to visually show how a product could benefit consumers in real-world situations and how well-designed products can create an emotional attachment for the people using them. Try communicating that in a spreadsheet. If a picture is worth a 1,000 words, a good storyboard may be worth 10,000.

Here are a few resources I’ve used for sketching user experience design:

Happy Sketching.